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OPHTHALMIC IMAGES
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 109

Traumatic cataract with linear anterior lens capsular rupture and zonular dehiscence in a child


Department of Glaucoma, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission25-Sep-2020
Date of Acceptance22-Dec-2020
Date of Web Publication27-Mar-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sharmila Rajendrababu
Department of Glaucoma, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Madurai, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/tjosr.tjosr_144_20

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How to cite this article:
Rajendrababu S, Senthilkumar VA. Traumatic cataract with linear anterior lens capsular rupture and zonular dehiscence in a child. TNOA J Ophthalmic Sci Res 2021;59:109

How to cite this URL:
Rajendrababu S, Senthilkumar VA. Traumatic cataract with linear anterior lens capsular rupture and zonular dehiscence in a child. TNOA J Ophthalmic Sci Res [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Apr 23];59:109. Available from: https://www.tnoajosr.com/text.asp?2021/59/1/109/312293



A 4-year-old child was brought by her mother with alleged history of injury to the left eye (LE) with a wooden stick 2 weeks prior to presentation. On examination, vision in the LE was perception of light with accurate projection of rays. Slit-lamp examination of the LE revealed a clear cornea with diffuse iris atropy and sphincter tears, intumescent traumatic cataract with linear anterior capsular rupture and pigment dispersion over the lens capsule, and 4–6 clock hours of zonular rupture [Figure 1]. The child underwent cataract extraction by pars plana route. Pediatric traumatic cataract is one of the leading causes of monocular blindness in children.[1] Blunt or penetrating trauma to a developing eye will lead to more severe complications, such as vitreous proliferation diseases. Management of traumatic cataract in pediatric patients should be varied according to the age, mode of injury, traumatic type, and associated injuries.[2] Children with visually significant traumatic cataracts can have good outcomes if they are managed aggressively and appropriately.
Figure 1: Slit-lamp photograph of the left eye showing a clear cornea with diffuse iris atropy and sphincter tears, intumescent traumatic cataract with linear anterior capsular rupture and pigment dispersion over the lens capsule, and 4–6 clock hours of zonular rupture

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Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Khandekar R, Sudhan A, Jain BK, Shrivastav K, Sachan R. Pediatric cataract and surgery outcomes in Central India: A hospital based study. Indian J Med Sci 2007;61:15-22.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.
Reddy AK, Ray R, Yen KG. Surgical intervention for traumatic cataracts in children: Epidemiology, complications, and outcomes. J AAPOS 2009;13:170-4.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


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