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 Table of Contents  
OPHTHALMIC IMAGES
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 416

Limbal dermoid in Goldenhar–Gorlin syndrome


Department of Glaucoma, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission25-Mar-2020
Date of Decision10-Apr-2020
Date of Acceptance21-Apr-2020
Date of Web Publication21-Dec-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Vijayalakshmi A Senthilkumar
Department of Glaucoma, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Madurai, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/tjosr.tjosr_30_20

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How to cite this article:
Senthilkumar VA. Limbal dermoid in Goldenhar–Gorlin syndrome. TNOA J Ophthalmic Sci Res 2021;59:416

How to cite this URL:
Senthilkumar VA. Limbal dermoid in Goldenhar–Gorlin syndrome. TNOA J Ophthalmic Sci Res [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jan 25];59:416. Available from: https://www.tnoajosr.com/text.asp?2021/59/4/416/333165



We report a case of a 40-year-old male presented to us with limbal dermoid in the left eye [Figure 1]a and [Figure 1]b. Systemic examination revealed preauricular tags and vertebral anomalies. Goldenhar–Gorlin syndrome or oculo-auriculo-vertebral dysplasia is a rare congenital malformation of the structures developed from the first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis period of embryo formation (30–45 days of intrauterine life). The incidence has been reported to be 1:3500–1:5600, with a male-to-female ratio of 3:2.[1] Limbal or epibulbar dermoids occur in 35% of cases and appear as pale-yellowish solid mass lesions with hair shafts. Most often, it is located at the lower temporal limbus involving the conjunctiva and cornea and contains cellular elements from ectodermal and mesodermal origin such as hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, ectopic lacrimal gland, and cartilage. Surgical excision of the dermoid depends on multiple factors such as original size, rate of growth, secondary corneal defect/dellen, and psychosocial factors.[2],[3]
Figure 1: (a) Clinical photograph of the left eye showing an inferotemporal limbal dermoid in a patient with Goldenhar–Gorlin syndrome. (b) Magnified image of the same showing multiple hair follicles

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Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Gorlin RJ, Cohen MM, Hennekam RC. Syndromes of the Head and Neck. 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press; 2001.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Madiyal A, Babu SG, Ajila V, Madi M, Bhat S. Goldenhar syndrome: Report of two cases with review of literature. CHRISMED J Health Res 2018;5:67-71.  Back to cited text no. 2
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3.
del Rocio Arce Gonzalez M, Navas A, Haber A, Ramírez-Luquín T, Graue-Hernández EO. Ocular dermoids: 116 consecutive cases. Eye Contact Lens 2013;39:188-91.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


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